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ASMAC New York - feedback wanted!

Can you take a moment to offer some feedback...?


For a number of years, I have been involved with an organization in Los Angeles called ASMAC - the American Society of Musical Arrangers and Composers. ASMAC's mission is "to promote the arts of Music Arranging, Composition, and Orchestration within the commercial arts community and the general public... (by) providing a dynamic forum in which our members can make contact with each other to exchange ideas and information about the art of music and the music industry." You can find additional details about the organization at the bottom of the page.


I have long thought that ASMAC could be a valuable resource for the professional Broadway music community (and for those who aspire to join the ranks) - to that end, the ASMAC board of directors has asked me to suggest and organize programming that would be of interest to us.


ASMAC already offers some some webinars and master classes that are relevant to what we do - but what I love most about the group is that it also provides the opportunity to interact with colleagues on a social level. I think that would be a great benefit to the NY arranging community - we do tend to get a bit compartmentalized!


We're hoping to organize an online forum within the next few weeks - what I'm looking for is feedback about what we might discuss. Some ideas:


- Our favorite technology: what we're currently using and why we like it;

- Workflow: ways to improve and streamline how we work together;

- Music teams and sound designers: how we can strengthen our relationships;

- Corona-musings: how we're keeping busy and preparing for whatever comes next;

- Broadway Music Departments in the 2020's: where we are now, and where we're going.


Please leave your suggestions in the comments below or in the Facebook comments - and feel free to message me privately if you'd like to be added to the ASMAC mailing list.


Thank you!

Here's the complete description of the organization, from their website:


About The American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers

The American Society of Music Arrangers and Composers, better known by the acronym "ASMAC", promotes the arts of Music Arranging, Composition, and Orchestration within the commercial arts community and the general public by educating and informing both about the roles our members play in the creation of music, past and present. We provide a dynamic forum in which our members can make contact with each other to exchange ideas and information about the art of music and the music industry. Always with an eye to the future, we encourage and support emerging arrangers and composers in their development so that they may carry the flame into the future.


The group's history is also very interesting:


ASMAC History: Eighty Years and Still Going Strong

In 1938, a group of composers and arrangers writing music for movies, being dissatisfied with the lack of appreciation for their efforts, decided to band together and form an organization to promote their general interests. This group of arrangers and composers were out standing practitioners of their art, and possibly, man for man, may not be equaled to the present day: Eddie Powell, Conrad Salinger, Walter Scharf, and many others. They dubbed their group “The American Society of Music Arrangers” (ASMA), the predecessor to ASMAC. Despite the fact that they were also composers, they decided to stress their importance as arrangers, where their rights were sadly nonexistent. At that time there were eight major studios, and each studio had its own thirty-five to fifty-piece staff orchestra on full employment. One of ASMA’s first goals was to also be fully employed. When they tried to get a royalty for their orchestrations, they were dismally bound for failure, a situation that still exists to this day. They concentrated on other values, like screen credits, better working conditions, improved union scales, even parking privileges, and anything they could think of that might not be too objectionable to the powers that were. The first president of ASMA was Robert Russell Bennett. In 1987 the name ASMA was changed to ASMAC, a belated recognition of the fact that most members were also practicing composers. The membership has now grown to over 500, and the goals and camaraderie are also continuing to expand by welcoming members who are, or have been, active in the preparation of music for movies, theatre, recording, television and live performances. Through monthly luncheons, seminars and master classes and workshops, and “Honor our Own” events, we strive to bring the long term members into contact with students and young professionals seeking to become composers or arrangers in an unofficial mentorship program.


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